Longer Nurse Tenure on Hospital Units Leads to Higher-Quality Care

(Columbia University Medical Center) When it comes to the cost and quality of hospital care, nurse tenure and teamwork matters. Patients get the best care when they are treated in units that are staffed by nurses who have extensive experience in their current job, according to a study from researchers at Columbia University School of Nursing and Columbia Business School. The study was published in the current issue of the American Economics Journal: Applied Economics. [Read more...]

Newly licensed RNs report having fewer job opportunities

(Nurse.com) Compared with six years ago, newly licensed RNs have greater job commitment but are more likely to work part-time, and to report that they had fewer job opportunities, according to a study. [Read more...]

Should a nurse be your family doctor?

(MetroNews)  A legislative audit recommends that advanced practice registered nurses in West Virginia be allowed to expand the scope of their care, but the recommendations do not go as far as the APRNs want.

Legislative Auditor Aaron Allred’s report suggests that further empowering APRNs to provide more primary care would help address the doctor shortage in West Virginia.  However, Allred stopped short of suggesting the nurses could operate independent of physicians. [Read more...]

Men proud to take place in nursing field

(News Leader) Joe Long first thought of becoming a nurse when his wife was hospitalized for a week during her pregnancy with their second child.

He now works at Mercy Hospital Springfield, taking care of patients in the intensive care unit.

“Nursing is manly,” Long said. “It’s not just for women.”

About 6.6 percent of nurses nationwide are male, according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. In Springfield, about 7.3 percent of nurses at CoxHealth are male. At Mercy, about 11.4 percent of the nurses are male.

The American Assembly of Men in Nursing was formed in 1971 in Michigan to provide support for male nurses. An Ozarks chapter is being started. There are also chapters in St. Louis and Kansas City. The organization also is open to women.

“It’s a very female-oriented world and we’re OK with that, but men still need to socialize,” said Paul Pope, the chapter president and a nursing instructor at Southwest Baptist University.

The executive director of nursing at Mercy Hospital Springfield is a male nurse, Kurtis Abbey.

Nurses like him have faced some of the obstacles that women entering predominantly male fields have faced. There have been lawsuits and complaints about isolation.

Rick Leroux, a nursing instructor at Southwest Baptist, got into nursing with the encouragement of his aunt. He learned how to make chitchat with children and to be absolutely honest about whether a medical procedure would hurt.

He treasures moments such as an encounter with the adult daughter of a man he had cared for who had a heart attack. She hugged Leroux and thanked him.

“Those are the moments we live for,” Leroux said.

Female employees at Mercy said they appreciate male nurses when it comes to lifting patients. They also value other qualities such as help in dealing with sometimes-disruptive families.

“We have a lot of difficult patients,” said Becky Pierce, who has worked at Mercy for about 40 years. “For each difficult patient, you have family members who sometimes need the physical presence of a man.”

Dr. Tobey Cronnell said male nurses tend to be more supportive of female doctors.

“I particularly enjoy working with male nurses as a female physician,” Cronnell said.

Long recently tended to John Goar, 73, who was admitted to Mercy Hospital Springfield after having trouble breathing.

Long gave him insulin and some other medication and then told Goar that his relatives were on their way to visit.

“He’s as good as a woman,” Goar said.

Long left Goar’s room. He was about halfway through his 12-hour shift. He doesn’t miss his previous career as a loan officer for a mortgage company.

“It’s the first time I have a job where I actually look forward to going to work,” he said.

 

Nurses Save United Pilot Having Possible Heart Attack Mid-Flight

Talk about high drama.

In an emergency situation called straight out of a movie, two nurses saved a United Airlines pilot having a possible heart attack mid-flight last month. [Read more...]

Bill pushes nurse practitioners as solution to primary care shortage

(The Sentinel) Lorraine Bock was a nurse practitioner for 20 years, the bulk of which she served as the head of Bock Family Healthcare off West Trindle Road in Middlesex Township.

Last Thursday, however, Bock closed her family practice because of the costs and requirements associated with being a nurse practitioner in the family care field.

“It’s truly an economic issue,” said Bock, who is president of the Pennsylvania Coalition of Nurse Practitioners and now works in the state’s Legislative Health Services. “But it’s not just a Lorraine Bock issue. No single (nurse practitioner) provider can survive in the environment that exists now.” [Read more...]

Moving Time for Nurses Who Don’t Need Doctors

(Texas Tribune) As an advanced practice nurse specializing in family medicine, Holly Jeffreys operates the only medical clinics in two rural Texas Panhandle counties. The state requires that she have a contract with a physician to supervise both clinics, but she operates the facilities almost independently. [Read more...]

Nurse education expansion creates failing programs

(Miami Herald) Laws passed in recent years to boost the number of nurses in Florida have resulted in more nursing education programs on probation and more nursing graduates failing the national competency examination.

Measures passed unanimously by the Florida Legislature in 2009 and 2010 allowed colleges and trade schools to open nursing programs without the scrutiny of the state’s 13-member Board of Nursing, which for years has assessed and approved proposed nurse education programs. [Read more...]

New Report: Nurses Practicing Independently in Retail Clinics Deliver Significant Cost Savings for Many Common Conditions

(Market Watch) A new study co-led(1) by UnitedHealth Group’sUNH -0.05% Center for Nursing Advancement shows that nurse practitioners (NPs) practicing in retail clinics have the potential to deliver significant cost savings when treating a range of common conditions, with the greatest savings occurring in states that allow NPs to practice independently. [Read more...]

Nurse’s life revolved around giving, helping

(TribReview) When Terra Welsh learned that many diabetic children could not go to a summer camp because of their condition, she helped start a summer camp for them.

“She would take two weeks of her own vacation time to be with the kids, and she did that for several years,” said her sister, Paula Fleming of Cranberry. “She always thought of other people before herself.”

Terra M. Welsh of McCandless, a teacher turned nurse, died of cancer on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013, in Forbes Hospice in Bloomfield. She was 54. [Read more...]